Attackers take down Canadian intelligence site

Hackers temporarily shut down the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) website on Monday night using a DDoS attack, the second time in weeks that Canadian government sites have been attacked, reportedly in protest against the new Bill C-51 anti-terror laws.

The bill was enacted following a terror attack in Quebec last October but its critics claim it infringes civil rights as it increases police powers to arrest and detain individuals without charge, ‘invades their digital privacy' and allows the CSIS to actively tackle terror activity outside Canada.

Local broadcaster CTV's Mercedes Stephenson reported that they were in contact with a rogue hacker, formerly associated with Anonymous, who had launched what appeared to be a denial of service attack.

What is believed to be the hacker discussed on Twitter whether to “let CSIS back online and hit another government website”, or continue attacking the website; in another Twitter post, he said  that the next target was the Royal Canadian Mounted Police website.

Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, spokesman for Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney, issued a statement saying that the hack on the CSIS website is “another reminder of the serious security challenges and threats that we are facing,” adding, “Security officials have confirmed that no personal information was compromised in this attack.”

HackRead reports that the Anonymous hacker behind the attack says the group will continue to target the Canadian government and there will be another cyber-attack within few days.

Earlier this month ServiceCanada.gc.ca and Parl.gc.ca, were hit by a cyber-attack in relation to the bill, for which Anonymous claimed responsibility in a video on YouTube (#OpCyberPrivacy). 

Treasury board president Tony Clement confirmed that a denial of service attack took place. 

On June 24 Anonymous is reported to have breached the server of Police Association of Ontario, Canada (pao.ca) and leaked personal details of its 1,300 employees and registered users.

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