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European Commission vice president claims official laptops were hacked at Azerbaijan internet conference

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European Commission vice president Neelie Kroes has admitted that her advisor's laptops were hacked while attending a conference in Azerbaijan.

Writing in a blog post, Kroes said that the laptops of her advisers were hacked while they were attending the Internet Governance Forum (IDF) in the capital city of Baku.

She said she was "denied access to meet political prisoners, despite a commitment from the president himself".

“Activists were harassed at the internet conference. My advisers had their computers hacked. So much for openness,” she said.

According to Softpedia, Kroes' spokesman Ryan Heath told AP that while they were at the hotel, he and one of his colleagues received warnings from Apple that their computers had been illegally accessed, and believed that this might have been an attempt to spy on them.

Azerbaijani officials told Trend that "the statement has no basis", with authorities launching an investigation into the matter to find out if what European Commission officials have said is true.

Head of the Azerbaijani presidential administration social and political department, Ali Hasanov, said: “Any interference into their computers is out of the question, no evidence and facts confirming these statements have been revealed.”

He said he was confident that there was no "interference in their computers" and advised them to file a complaint with the Azerbaijani Prosecutor General's Office, which will investigate the case.

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