Infamous 'Guccifer' claims he breached Hillary Clinton's email server

Romanian jailed hacker Marcel Lehel Lazar, otherwise known as ‘Guccifer', claims that he repeatedly breached the personal email server of US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in early 2013 when she was Secretary of State.

From his prison cell, the hacker provided extensive details about how easily he hacked the server and what he found. The 44-year-old Lazar said in March 2013 that he compromised the AOL account of Sidney Blumenthal, a confidant of Clinton, and used that to get to the Clinton server. Lazar's claims could not be independently confirmed.

In response to the claims, the Clinton campaign issued the following statement: “There is absolutely no basis to believe the claims made by this criminal from his prison cell. In addition to the fact that he offers no proof to support his claims, his descriptions of Secretary Clinton's server are inaccurate. It is unfathomable that he would have gained access to her emails and not leaked them the way he did to his other victims.”

While the Clinton private email server that caused all the trouble was the one used while she was Secretary of State, Lazar seemed to describe that of a campaign office machine. In a video, he said, “For me it was not like the Hillary Clinton server it was like an email server she and others were using with political voting stuff.”

Lazar said he saw, “up to 10 like IPs from other parts of the world. You can get the numbers only but you can tell by the numbers the region of the world.” It's almost as if the Clinton server was receiving messages from servers all over the world.

It is unclear as to whether Lazar is telling the truth, however computer security specialists said the process is plausible and the Clinton server may have an electronic record that would verify Lazar's claims.

Other past victims of Guccifer include Colin Powell and a member of the Bush family. Lazar was extradited in early April to a Virginia jail from a Romanian prison where he was serving a seven-year sentence for cyber-crimes.

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