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Laptops should not be used for backing up or storing data

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Laptops are a poor option for data storage.

 

William Pound, senior director of international operations at Absolute Software, claimed that efficient backup methods should be used as well as tracking and recovery software.

 

Pound said: “Laptops are a tool used to do business, but they do blur into our personal lives as we are also likely to keep personal information on them – everything from bank statements to friends and family's contact details and photographs. So what happens when laptops are lost or stolen?

 

“There is a simple answer - tracking and recovery software which is already installed on most leading laptop manufacturers' devices. This would have meant that, not only could the Duchess's photographs have been backed up automatically, even if they hadn't, they could have been retrieved remotely from the stolen laptop and deleted from it once they had been saved. This would have removed all fears of the pictures getting into the wrong hands.”

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