This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.X

Millions in Germany have data compromised in Vodafone hack

Share this article:

Authorities have identified an attacker suspected of carrying out a sophisticated hack against Vodafone Germany.

 

The individual was able to obtain information – including names, addresses, dates of birth, genders and banking details – on roughly two million of the mobile phone company's customers, a company spokesperson said, adding there was no access to credit card information, passwords, PIN numbers or mobile phone numbers.

 

Vodafone learned of the attack – which was possible due to insider knowledge of the company's IT infrastructure – on 5th September and is only alerting customers now because authorities did not want to compromise the investigation.

 

The attack is said to have only affected customers in Germany.

 

A Vodafone spokesperson said it is unlikely that banking information can be accessed, but nevertheless customers were told to monitor bank accounts and are warned to be on alert for email and phone phishing attacks that seek out further details.

 

The mobile company would not reveal the identity of the suspect, but according to reports, the perpetrator is alleged to be a subcontractor of Vodafone's administration system.

 

Vodaphone said it is taking actions to prevent this type of incident from occurring again, including reinstalling servers and changing passwords and certificates of all administrators.

 

Companies suffer from data breaches everyday, but it is not too often that millions of customers are affected. An attack on Sony's PlayStation Network in 2011 compromised personal information for roughly 77 million gamers. An attack on Heartland Payment Systems in 2008 also affected millions.

Share this article:

SC webcasts on demand

This is how to secure data in the cloud


Exclusive video webcast & Q&A sponsored by Vormetric


As enterprises look to take advantage of the cloud, they need to understand the importance of safeguarding their confidential and sensitive data in cloud environments. With the appropriate security safeguards, such as fine-grained access policies, a move to the cloud is as, or more, secure than an on-premise data storage.


View the webcast here to find out more

More in News

SharePoint users break own security rules

SharePoint users break own security rules

Privilege controls can work, but cannot cater for all eventualities, says Quocirca analyst Rob Bamforth.

Heartbleed slows down the internet

Heartbleed slows down the internet

As Hearbleed slows down the internet, experts say that two-factor authentication may the way forward to protect our web sessions.

Biometric data collection sparks privacy debate

Biometric data collection sparks privacy debate

You could be implicated as a criminal suspect, just by virtue of having that image in the non-criminal file, says the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).