Pan-European research shows 226m personal records breached over the last decade

Data breaches - a serious problem over the last decade...

Data breaches - a serious problem over the last decade...
Data breaches - a serious problem over the last decade...
Research just published claims to show that data breaches are more likely to occur due to the mistakes of employees and/or rogue employees, rather than external hackers within organisations.

According to the report - which was compiled by the Central European University's Centre for Media, Data and Society (CMDS) and is billed as the largest ever of its kind - the personal data of millions of Europeans have been compromised with 89 percent of the breaches being the fault of corporations, rather than governments or public service agencies.

Delving into the report - entitled `Data Breaches in Europe: Reported Breaches of Compromised Personal Records in Europe, 2005-2014' - reveals that 24 percent of the Europe-specific breaches were the result of breach attacks launched from the UK, and for every 100 people living in the UK, 200 personal records have been compromised.

The scale of the breaches that have occurred in Europe is breathtaking with 226m personal records compromised in Europe over the last decade.

Interestingly, the report suggests there are some unusual examples of data breach, where the data was lost or published in a surprising way.

"One example is from Denmark, where personal information of HIV patients was included in a PowerPoint presentation. This in itself was an accidental leak, but only for the audience at the presentation, however, later the PPT was published online. Another incident happened in the United Kingdom when a staff member of an educational institution lost their camera that held sensitive information, namely photographs of job applicants' passports," says the report.

"Another case took place before the 2011 Bulgarian elections when the Ministry of Foreign Affairs accidentally published online the names as well as the addresses of the permanent residences of Bulgarian nationals living abroad. Although the information was available online for a few hours, it made these citizens an easy and open target for theft and burglary," it adds.
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