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Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links

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Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links
Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links

Websense has announced a partnership with Facebook to protect users from malicious links.

When a user clicks on a link, it will be checked against the Websense ThreatSeeker Cloud, an advanced classification and malware identification platform; if the link is determined to be malicious, a page will offer the choice to continue at the user's own risk, return to the previous screen, or get more information on why it was flagged as suspicious.

Websense said its technology will add to Facebook's existing protections to stop users from clicking on links without knowing the trustworthiness of the destination.

Dan Hubbard, CTO at Websense, said: “Websense has been analysing and classifying the internet for more than 15 years and now all Facebook users will be protected by the same core technology that is used in our TRITON enterprise security solutions.

“Every day, Websense works to discover, investigate and report on advanced internet threats that are designed to circumvent anti-virus products. By providing real-time protection from malware, spyware, inappropriate content, data leaks and spam, we make it safe for people and businesses to use the web.”

Dan Rubinstein, Facebook product manager for site integrity, said: “Facebook cares deeply about protecting users from potentially malicious content on the internet. We are excited about our partnership with Websense to provide industry-leading tools to help our users protect themselves.”

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