This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.X

Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links

Share this article:
Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links
Websense partners Facebook to scan and detect malicious links

Websense has announced a partnership with Facebook to protect users from malicious links.

When a user clicks on a link, it will be checked against the Websense ThreatSeeker Cloud, an advanced classification and malware identification platform; if the link is determined to be malicious, a page will offer the choice to continue at the user's own risk, return to the previous screen, or get more information on why it was flagged as suspicious.

Websense said its technology will add to Facebook's existing protections to stop users from clicking on links without knowing the trustworthiness of the destination.

Dan Hubbard, CTO at Websense, said: “Websense has been analysing and classifying the internet for more than 15 years and now all Facebook users will be protected by the same core technology that is used in our TRITON enterprise security solutions.

“Every day, Websense works to discover, investigate and report on advanced internet threats that are designed to circumvent anti-virus products. By providing real-time protection from malware, spyware, inappropriate content, data leaks and spam, we make it safe for people and businesses to use the web.”

Dan Rubinstein, Facebook product manager for site integrity, said: “Facebook cares deeply about protecting users from potentially malicious content on the internet. We are excited about our partnership with Websense to provide industry-leading tools to help our users protect themselves.”

Share this article:

SC webcasts on demand

This is how to secure data in the cloud


Exclusive video webcast & Q&A sponsored by Vormetric


As enterprises look to take advantage of the cloud, they need to understand the importance of safeguarding their confidential and sensitive data in cloud environments. With the appropriate security safeguards, such as fine-grained access policies, a move to the cloud is as, or more, secure than an on-premise data storage.


View the webcast here to find out more

More in News

Police investigating after hacker steals 500,000 records from cosmetic surgery practice

Police investigating after hacker steals 500,000 records from ...

An unidentified hacker was able to access and exfiltrate almost half a million records on potential cosmetic surgery patients, it has been revealed.

Insider data thieves get away "scot free"

Insider data thieves get away "scot free"

Controls on access to data by both staff and ex-staff are lax, and even when caught, insiders stealing data get away 'scot-free' says new survey.

Government slated as Mumsnet becomes first UK Heartbleed victim

Government slated as Mumsnet becomes first UK Heartbleed ...

The Government's reaction to the 'Heartbleed' flaw has been criticised after the Mumsnet parenting site became the UK's first known victim of Heartbleed hackers.