WikiLeaks publishes archive of leaked Sony documents

WikiLeaks has published a searchable online archive of the documents and emails that were exposed in the aftermath of the Sony Pictures Entertainment data breach late last year.

The archive, which went live earlier today, totals 30,287 documents and 173,132 emails, all of which can be searched and downloaded.

WikiLeaks founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange, who remains in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, attempted to justify the release of the documents:

"This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation. It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it
stays there.”

The Sony data breach is among the largest in recent history, an attack which resulted in the loss of thousands of personal and financial records, as well as the leak of unreleased films. ‘The Interview', a comedy movie featuring Seth Rogen and James Franco as agents plotting to kill Kim Jong-Un, was temporarily postponed seemingly at the bequest of the hackers. FBI has pointed the finger of blame at North Korea, although researchers have said that insiders may be to blame instead.

Talking to SCMagazineUK.com, Raimund Genes, chief technology officer at Trend Micro commented that he believed it was criminal activity, saying: "I bet it was not North Korea. Look at how the malware was written.  The demands for payment - states don't do this.  And consider how well Sony was protected (having been breached previously) - and their films are supposed to be their crown jewels? - terabytes of data exfiltrated. Users must have wondered why the network was so slow."

Since then, US President Barack Obama has established a new cyber-intelligence agency and announced a recent order for the government to authorise sanctions against individuals or entities who threaten national security.