Yahoo and Microsoft respond to Right To Be Forgotten requests

Yahoo and Microsoft's Bing search engine have joined Google in responding to ‘Right To Be Forgotten' requests – under which users ask for search results to be deleted from search engines' European domains.

Bing first published its request form back in July but has only now – via a contractor which helps facilitate the requests – confirmed that it is removing links.

“There have been 699 demands for ‘search engine result' removal requests on Bing handled via Forget.me since the 23rd of July, representing a total of 2,362 URLs. So far, 79 requests have received an answer from Bing,” explained Reputation VIP, the firm which handles the Forget.me website used by Bing surfers.

Microsoft started responding to these requests following the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling in May that search engines must delete “inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant” data when requested by a member of public.

“We've begun processing requests as a result of the court's ruling and in accordance with the guidance from European data protection authorities,” a Microsoft spokesperson explained to The Next Web. “While we're still refining that process, our goal is to strike a satisfactory balance between individual privacy interests and the public's interest in free expression.”

Yahoo later told The Wall Street Journal that it has also started responding to requests, and deleting links.

Google was the first company to publish a Right To Be Forgotten form following on from the landmark ECJ ruling in May, which saw a Spanish man successfully argue for links to his name to be removed from the search engine.

The search giant has received more than 174,000 requests across 600 URLs to date. It has removed 41.5 percent of these from search results.

Last week, the EU Article 29 Working Group, which is composed of a panel of data protection watchdogs, urged Google to apply Right to Be Forgotten search deletions outside of Europe on Google.com.