A lack of synchronisation of operating systems and threats to mobile devices are seen as the next security threats.

In a debate on ‘the next generation of security for the new decade', the shift from PC to mobile work was raised. Dan Hubbard, chief technology officer at Websense, commented that there had been a shift from fame to fortune in terms of hacking, but times are now getting interesting due to the use of mobile phones and how data and information are being used.

He said: “We have not thought about the problems, everything is virtualised and seems to know where you are. The attackers have a different angle and there are a lot of interesting angles that can be used.

“People are still using data, and it is definitely no joke about identity theft. It all revolves around data. No one is losing sight of problems but in perspective of bigger issues, new laws and new proposals, the security industry has done a good job.”

Mark Murtagh, director of sales engineering EMEA at Websense, said: “Threat and challenges will continue to evolve and companies are more concerned about missing the next big thing. They are afraid of missing out on the competitive edge and taking the company there. People still have to make decisions.”

Talking about the challenges presented by managing and working with different operating systems, particularly on mobile phones, Louis Gamon, information security officer at John Lewis, said that in his position he needs to get a situation where it does not matter what operating system is used.

He said: “We have got to get to the situation where I know that I will be okay, where it does not matter what I plug into. Businesses are not interested in the security side, we want to get on with it.”

Gamon also commented that despite the amount of threats and potential risks in the wild, a loss of information would likely hurt the company more than a specific threat.