A recently discovered botnet that contained 1.9 million infected computers contained 73 government domains.

 

Finjan's UK regional director Tim Warner claimed that when it was discovered in February it was one of the largest botnets to be found and identified. Further analysis revealed that 45 per cent of the domains were in the computing and internet sector.

 

Warner said: “Conficker claimed to have many more infections but they were only estimates, this was confirmed. We found that it was being controlled by six Ukrainian people who could send out whatever they wanted and were selling the control of it for $100 a day for 1,000 machines.

 

“Criminals are not stupid but clever and innovative, with these government domains part of the bot, by the end of the year how much will it cost to rent them? This breaks all compliance forms, we believe that it is only so long before one of the infected machines could be an endpoint in a bank.”

 

Warner also revealed that the details of the controllers had been passed to the Metropolitan Police, and claimed that only four anti-virus providers had signatured it.

The announcement of the botnet was made on the 22nd April, which it claimed was one of the largest bot networks controlled by a single team of cybercriminals (or cybergang) found this year. As folders on this server were left open, the Finjan malicious code research centre was able to get more information for its research.

 

It also found that 45 per cent of the infected computers were in the US, with six per cent in the UK. Yuval Ben-Itzhak, CTO of Finjan, said: “As predicted by Finjan at the end of last year, cybercriminals keep on looking for improved methods to distribute their malware and Trojans are winning the race.

 

“The sophistication of the malware and the staggering amount of infected computers proves that cybergangs are raising the bar. As big money drives today's cybercrime activities, organisations and corporations need to protect their valuable data to prevent theft by these kind of sophisticated cyberattacks.”