Access to both Facebook and Windows has been reportedly removed to employees of Google.

A report by the Financial Times yesterday claimed that Google is phasing out the internal use of Microsoft Windows because of security concerns. Following the Google hacking incident in January, which it transpired was due to a vulnerability in legacy versions of Internet Explorer and was later patched, a Google employee claimed that it was ‘not doing any more Windows. It is a security effort'.

Another said: “Many people have been moved away from [Windows] PCs, mostly towards Mac OS, following the China hacking attacks.”

The FT claimed that new employees are now given the option of using Apple's Mac computers or PCs running the Linux operating system.

Employees wanting to stay on Windows required clearance from ‘quite senior levels', one employee said. Another said ‘Getting a new Windows machine now requires CIO approval'.

With Google set to launch an operating system based on the Chrome browser, some employees said it was also an effort to run the company on Google's own products.

Responding to a comment request by Engadget, a Google spokesperson said: “We're always working to improve the efficiency of our business, but we don't comment on specific operational matters.”

Meanwhile, Rackspace evangelist Robert Scoble said on Twitter that ‘the real story isn't that Google has dropped Microsoft, but rather than [sic] Google forbids its employees to use Facebook APIs'.

When another user commented that this seemed unlikely, Scoble said: “Many Google employees have told me they aren't allowed to use Facebook in Google products. Have you seen any? I haven't.”