Nottingham's students and community members are to receive software to protect their laptops.

 

Nottinghamshire Police, the Crime and Drugs Partnership and other agencies have provided funding to give out the licenses for ComputraceOne from Absolute Software free of charge in a bid to reduce laptop theft.

 

ComputraceOne enables the Absolute Theft Recovery Team to work with local police forces, to track and recover the equipment. The scheme will offer free protection for thousands of computers across the city in a bid to deter thieves from stealing them and to encourage handlers of stolen goods not to buy and sell them on.

 

In 2007, there were 665 burglaries in the city where laptops were stolen. Students are often victims of this type of crime and can lose valuable coursework as a result.

 

Detective inspector Sean Anderson, said: “This software will provide peace of mind for many students and members of the public who are concerned about work and files stored on their laptops. People often forget to back up information on laptops, and if they are stolen it is lost forever.

 

"ComputraceOne enables us to work with the Absolute Theft Recovery Team to trace stolen laptops. The information is only tracked in the event of a theft and as the software is installed at factory level, it can only be disabled by the specialised team at Absolute.”

 

Allan Breeton, operations director at Nottingham CDP, said: “With this technology installed, stolen laptops can be pinpointed to any location, anywhere. No longer can a stolen laptop be sold on through the stolen property market anonymously, wherever the laptop ends up, the police will find it and find those responsible for stealing it.”