Dark web markets sell off victims' account data for as little as a dollar

News by Bradley Barth

Having your online account hacked is bad enough, but learning that your precious account details were sold for a little as US$ 1 (£0.77) on the dark web adds insult to injury.

Having your online account hacked is bad enough, but learning that your precious account details were sold for a little as US$ 1 (£0.77) on the dark web adds insult to injury.

In a company blog post today, David Jacoby, senior security researcher and evangelist at Kaspersky Lab, reported finding some bargain-basement offerings after browsing the digital black market for stolen online identities. Among the items he spotted for sale were 10 random Steam keys for US$ 10 (£7.70), a premium Spotify account for just US$ 2 (£1.50), and a Netflix account for US$ 4 (£3.10).

Customers buying in bulk could actually purchase 100 Steam accounts for merely US$ 14.99 (£11.50).

"The most common way to steal this data is via phishing campaigns or by exploiting a web-related vulnerability such as an SQL injection vulnerability," wrote Jacoby. "The password dumps contain an email and password combination for the hacked services, but as we know most people reuse their passwords," so anyone purchasing stolen credentials could potentially gain access to these accounts as well.

Jacoby said that hacked account information from online banks, social media platforms, and digital consumer services is most popular type of data sold on the black market.

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