F-Secure have called for the establishment of an international police unit to tackle online crime.

 

Chief research officer Mikko Hyppönen has warned that the current confusion in law enforcement is ineffective and a global approach is required.

 

 He claimed that what is needed is an online version of the police co-operative Interpol, which he named ‘Internerpol', who would be specially tasked with targeting and investigating the top of the crime-ware food chain.

 

Hyppönen said: “The Internet has no borders and online crime is almost always international, yet local police authorities often have limited resources for investigations.”

 

He claimed that one of the main problems is that there are some countries where writing and spreading malware is not yet a crime owing to the relatively new nature of the activity and legislators having other priorities.

 

Recently Jeremy Jaynes, a prolific spammer in the United States, has had his conviction overturned by the Virginia Supreme Court following a ruling that the state Anti-Spam Law violated the First Amendment to the Constitution concerning the right to free and anonymous speech.

 

Hyppönen said: “If we do not act now to fight the source of crime-ware, it will continue to grow stronger and threaten to destroy the current model of internet business, banking and commerce. Even if the locations of online criminals are discovered, the investigations rarely uncover the full scope of the crime. The victims, police, prosecutors and judges cannot see the full picture and therefore do not know the true costs of the crime.”

 

A specialised e-crime unit was created in 2002 in Scotland, while steps to a national e-crime co-ordination unit were made in 2007. The concept was well received, Geoff Donson, Group Security Manager at TelecityGroup, said: “The industry needs people who want an outlet and someone to support us and we are totally in support of it.”