Google & US chipmakers pull the plug on Huawei's Android phones after Trump blacklist

Google has stopped supporting Android updates on Huawei smartphones, after the Trump administration blacklisted the company and affiliates, according to a newswire report.

Google has stopped supporting Android updates on Huawei smartphones, after the Trump administration blacklisted the company and affiliates, according to a newswire report.

A Reuters report cited sources at Google saying that Huawei will lose access to updates, and future smartphones from the company will not have access to applications and services, including the Gmail app and Google Play Store.

Alphabet Inc, the parent company of Google, will also halt the technical support and collaboration for Android and Google services offered to the Chinese telecom company, the report added.

However, current Huawei smartphones with Google apps will be able to use and download app updates given by Google, according to the @Android twitter handle.

"We assure you while we are complying with all US gov't requirements, services like Google Play & security from Google Play Protect will keep functioning on your existing Huawei device," it tweeted.

A Huawei statement published by The Verge said the company has been a key global partner for Android and their association has benefitted both customers and the industry. "Huawei will continue to provide security updates and after-sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products, covering those that have been sold and that are still in stock globally," the statement said.

Huawei is currently second among the world’s most popular smartphone brands, inching up from below five percent in 2013 to gain close to 20 percent of the global market share in early 2019, according to market research by Trendforce.

Meanwhile, crucial component suppliers have severed ties with Huawei after the US government’s blacklisting announcement, reported Bloomberg. The American companies that backed out include Qualcomm, Intel, Broadcom and Xilinx. According to the report, they will no longer supply Huawei until further notice.

@HuaweiFacts, the PR handle of the Chinese company, has retorted citing a news report that chipmakers have to consider doing business in China, currently the largest market for personal computers, smartphones and other devices that are the biggest consumers of chips, while pulling the plug on Huawei.

Meanwhile, the US ban will not affect Huawei’s role in rolling out 5G mobile networks in Europe, the Asia Times reported, citing two "high-ranking European government officials".

"Outright bans by country of origin should only be the last resort for policy makers. Bans risk getting the global economy deeper into costly trade wars," said Fred Roeder, managing director of the Consumer Choice Center.

The non-governmental organisation campaigns against restricting consumer choices by prohibitive laws and protectionist measures among others.

"Closed systems have a much higher likelihood of hiding vulnerabilities. Hence more open systems and open source approaches can really help consumers, and governments, trust the security promises of 5G providers," he added.

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