A third of IT managers are unaware of social networking use on their networks.

While Web 2.0 applications have been adopted by 99 per cent of end-users to support business processes, 38 per cent of IT professionals believe there is no social networking present on their networks.

The results of FaceTime's fifth annual survey found that web chat featured in 95 per cent of organisations, yet was recognised by only 31 per cent of IT managers. The use of internet applications has grown from being present in 78 per cent of enterprises in 2007 to 99 per cent of enterprise networks, with tools ranging from public instant messaging, Skype, file sharing, web conferencing and IPTV becoming commonplace.

Nick Sears, vice president of EMEA at FaceTime, said: “The power of social networks and public Web 2.0 tools for business is proven, as we've seen in the universal adoption by end-users, even alongside corporate-provided tools. The IT function needs to take a serious look at the reality of what is happening on their networks and find ways to securely support public Web 2.0 applications.

“Our survey not only shows dramatic differences between what IT professionals believe is taking place on the network and what end-users are actually using, but also shows a significant rise in the requirement to secure, control and retain content in the social networking and Web 2.0 space.”

The report also showed that 69 per cent of organisations reported at least one Web 2.0-related attack, while worries about employee productivity with relation to Web 2.0 have fallen, with just 24 per cent reporting productivity concerns as an issue, down from 74 per cent in 2007.