Public sector workers want to be harsher with IT providers who fail to deliver.

 

Results from a Social Collaboration and Public Sector study conducted by Huddle.net revealed that 84 per cent of respondents believe that setting project budgets that cannot be deviated from could partially solve the issue. However there were comments stating that if the IT does not work the respondent would not pay for the service.

 

A third of respondents believe that IT problems could be solved by buying from UN-based companies rather than multi-nationals, with purchasing departments encouraged to ‘get better advice before buying' and ‘not to buy for buying's sake.' Half of the respondents claimed that they were disappointed with a lack of innovation in IT services.

 

Public sector workers also admitted struggling with existing IT infrastructure as 80 per cent claimed they received too many emails, while 26 per cent could not access information they required to perform their job. A few respondents confessed the majority of their tasks still comprise of managing paper, letters and memos.

 

Following reports of Government IT projects suffering from inefficiencies and overspend, the study results further support the recent Enterprise Strategy and Budget 2008, which is looking to help more small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) win public sector contracts. The goal is to ensure that SMEs win 30 per cent of all public sector contracts.

 

Alastair Mitchell, co-founder and CEO at Huddle.net, a social collaboration firm that enables employees to work together both inside and outside their organisations, said: “In our experience public sector workers are already leading their private sector counterparts in adopting new technologies - but there is obvious demand to go a lot further. There's enough technology acumen amongst homegrown companies in this country to make a real difference to the Government's ailing IT.

 

“Public sector workers already know that efficiencies can be made with using collaborative technologies for work, so it's time that IT heads caught up.”