Monitoring and blocking child sexual abuse images can be undertaken, with new software from NetClean Technologies.  

CEO Christian Sjöberg explained that NetClean ProActive is designed to block images on both the internet and on removable media that have not previously been picked up by solutions that only block access to inappropriate websites containing images.

Sjöberg said that it works in a similar fashion to anti-virus and it works with a global proxy scan that is not invisible but transparent.

He said: “It will send a report to the security officer and they will look at it, and get the evidence and report to the police to take action. This cannot be used as evidence and if you are not interested in scanning for child abuse images then it is not worth it.”

NetClean ProActive can be deployed either in the network or on every computer as a desktop agent. It can analyse activity on individual machines such as laptops, even when they have been unplugged from a work-based network. When the machine is reconnected to the network NetClean ProActive picks up and identifies traces of any child sexual abuse images that might have been viewed on the computer during the period the machine was offline.

Sjöberg was asked if this could create false positives, with family pictures as an example. He said: “It compares against existing images, abuse can be different but not with sexual images, this does not create false positives. If the remaining security reports creates too much stress then you should do a proper investigation.”

John Carr, a key adviser to the UK Government on internet safety for children, said: “Although we're getting better at detecting child abuse images on the internet and blocking access to the sites that contain them, far too many images are available from other sources, such as file-sharing networks.

“This means abusers can continue to look at these awful and illegal pictures and swap them with like minded people. This often happens at work and with NetClean, companies now have a way of stepping in to help with this most important child protection measure.”