Secure Computing Corporation is incorporating three new signature file types for SCADA-specific protocols into its Secure Firewall product.

 

The three new SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) signature types are the SCADA:ICCP, SCADA:MODBUS and SCADA:DNP3.0.

 

The Inter-Control Center Communications Protocol (ICCP or IEC 60870-6/TASE.2) is being specified by utility organizations to provide data exchange over wide area networks (WANs) between utility control centers, utilities, power pools, regional control centers, and Non-Utility Generators.

 

Modbus is a serial communications protocol for use with its programmable logic controllers (PLCs) while DNP3.0 (Distributed Network Protocol) is a set of communications protocols used between components in process automation systems.

 

Elan Winkler, director of Critical Infrastructure Solutions for Secure Computing, said: “Critical infrastructure is under intense scrutiny by regulators and hackers alike. Securing these networks is a national imperative, not an option.

 

“Unfortunately, most security devices aren't designed to meet the special needs of control networks. They cannot filter SCADA-specific protocols to prevent attacks against these critical infrastructure networks.”

The three new SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) signature types are the SCADA:ICCP, SCADA:MODBUS and SCADA:DNP3.0.

 

The Inter-Control Center Communications Protocol (ICCP or IEC 60870-6/TASE.2) is being specified by utility organizations to provide data exchange over wide area networks (WANs) between utility control centers, utilities, power pools, regional control centers, and Non-Utility Generators.

 

Modbus is a serial communications protocol for use with its programmable logic controllers (PLCs) while DNP3.0 (Distributed Network Protocol) is a set of communications protocols used between components in process automation systems.

 

Elan Winkler, director of Critical Infrastructure Solutions for Secure Computing, said: “Critical infrastructure is under intense scrutiny by regulators and hackers alike. Securing these networks is a national imperative, not an option.

 

“Unfortunately, most security devices aren't designed to meet the special needs of control networks. They cannot filter SCADA-specific protocols to prevent attacks against these critical infrastructure networks.”